BENGALURU: Bengaluru On September 29, seven students of Indus International School, Bengaluru, planted their feet on the highest point in Africa: the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

Reaching the mountain’s summit was an unforgettable moment for Siddharth Singh, Tarush Harris, Mihir Kansal, Aryaman Verma, Jasmeher Singh, Rahul Rao and William Joseph. The team was part of the 10-day expedition organized by the school, `Peak to Lead’ from September 24. They reached the peak – 5,895m above sea level – at the end of a 36km trek through the Marangu Route.

Tarush, a class 10 student, said he was overwhelmed by emotion when he reached the summit. “I felt that all the effort I had put into this endeavour was worth it. I felt proud that life had presented me with such an opportunity,” he added. Mihir, also class 10 student, said he intended to conquer the seven tallest peaks in all the continents.

On the first night, the group halted amid the lush rainforest at Horombu Hut, at an altitude of 3,780m to get acclimatized to the conditions. Led by Captain Mohit, the team then faced a gruelling 6km steep climb. The sight which met their eyes when they reached the acme was wondrous – the view of the dormant volcano along with glaciers on the periphery of the rim.

Adversity and challenging circumstances forge leadership, affirmed Captain Mohit, the expedition-in-charge and trainer at the Indus School of Leadership, an in-house training institute at the school. With its onus on leadership, the school believes in instilling resilience and self-reliance in its students. The expedition to Mount Kilimanjaro was one such endeavour, he added.

Class 9 student Rahul Rao said, ” I have become more self reliant. In the wilderness, you don’t have any gadgets or tools; the environment pushes you to help yourself.”

Principal of Indus International School, Sarojini Rao said: “We believe in preparing students for the challenges of life. In facing these situations, students develop leadership skills that equips them to address life’s hurdles.”

Eleanor Roosevelt told us, “Do one thing every day that scares you”.

Dr. Anindita Bhateja is not doing one thing a day but she is getting pretty close to it. MD Medicine by qualification, consultant physician at Sita Bhateja Speciality Hospital by profession, Dr. Anindita has conquered more fears than most of us. On a typical day, her day starts with exercise and ends with her evenings juggling between home and work. Her work brings her in contact with patients ailing from diabetes, hypertension, and her speciality: infectious disease.

This is a typical day, but there are some atypical adventures that Dr. Anindita takes up in her life. She is set out to conquer her fears one at a time. A famous Latin proverb, “bis vincit qui se vincit” says he/she who prevails over himself/herself is twice victorious. That’s exactly what Dr. Anindita does. She faces her fears and conquers them, thus conquering herself.

Since childhood, Dr. Anindita had a fear of heights and she decided to overcome it in a grand fashion –  she scaled Tiger’s Nest, a 1000m climb ending with a Buddhist Monastery in September 2014. Her research on Tiger’s nest had warned her about its beauty and the difficulty in scaling it but, she moved ahead and climbed it with the help of her husband and 11-year-old daughter.

Dr. Anindita feels that her motivation for this regimen of conquering fear is the fact that there is only one life and she would like to do other things besides medicine in that period of time. Always up for trying something new, she decided to trek Kilimanjaro to better herself on this skill. Her first climb in January this year took her to the last camp but the summit went out of her reach. The biggest take away from this experience for Dr. Anindita, however, was her new found love for the mountains and the good people of Tanzania. Conquering acrophobia is just one feather in her hat. She has annihilated her fear of water by diving along with her fear of cycling too in the last year. However, this experience of scaling Kilimanjaro has brought her to a very interesting and promising juncture in her life.

Her love for Tanzania pushed her to open a company in Tanzania to help people summit Mt. Kilimanjaro, do the safari, visit Masai village. Thus, African Adventure was born. This time, when she went to research and take the first tour of African Adventure in July 2016, she reached the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro.

A practicing doctor, a persistent adventurer Dr. Anindita does seem to have it all. However, the journey till there was not without impediments. She faced her biggest challenge when she decided to pursue MD Medicine just 2 months after giving birth to a child. The circumstances were complicated as she was the only one tending to her 2-month-old infant while her husband was away at Mumbai pursuing his MS Surgery.

Her supporting colleagues and faculty helped her hang on to the roller coaster ride of studying and taking care of an infant at home simultaneously. Their professional and neutral way of handling her situation made her strong and taught her the art of balancing her home and work. This resulted in her coming out of this situation as a mature responsible woman.  She also has a unique way of handling the adversities that come in her path. She elaborates by telling us that, “Before starting a difficult task or at difficult times, I always think as to what would be the worst case scenario if I fail, and in my mind, I accept that failure. Once that is done then I am not fearful of the difficult time anymore and I proceed with my actions to get through it.

Her dad too was a brilliant physician. His excellent bedside manner and clinical expertise made the days Dr. Anindita spent in his clinic extremely inspiring. She strongly feels he is the reason that she is a doctor today. Like her father, her husband also inspires her to push herself to the limit and achieve what she sets out to. He is also very proud of her overcoming her fears and charting new paths for her. The adventurer in her advises others to get out there and work at making their dream come true. The adorable mum in her tells the young parents to find joy in their children. Love them and enjoy their growing up years before they fly away.

The Storified.me team wishes her great success!

Two weeks ago recruitment platform Geektrust.in cofounder Sneha Jain was exploring the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Africa. Besides soaking in the sights and sounds of the Great Wildebeest Migration in Serengeti, a kill by a lioness and staying in the heart of the reserve with wild hippos and giraffes for company, she was jolted by yet another experience. “We spent nearly 12 hours in the Jeep daily alongside other tourists during our eight-day trip. We noted a lot of chattering in Kannada and and found that most of the tourists were Bengalureans!” says Jain.

Escape to Africa has emerged as a fashionable fascination for Bengalureans. Primitive living of the Maasai tribes, gripping wildlife, historic pyramids and bazaars, diverse biosphere, cricket, adventure, food and people its unique untouched landscape has namma travellers hooked. And the city’s travel curators are cheerfully screaming Hakuna Matata! Conservationist and founder of niche expedition and safari company Africa Under Canvas, Saad Bin Jung, says, “Bengaluru is one of the biggest markets for Africa today. We see a 30 % increase in the tourist traffic each year. Like India, Africa was a British colony . The old connect has grown stronger.” Observing Bengaluru’s growing interest in countries like Tanzania, Zanzibar and Botswana, Jung has been curating luxurious adventures for budgets ranging from $400 to $2,000 per person.

Seema Jaising, proprietor of Che Experiences & Travels, adds, ” Africa is on everyone’s bucket list since two years. Europe still rules. Asia is the second favourite. Africa places third.”

Like Jung and Jaising, other experi ential travel curators too are leaving no stone unturned. Byond Travel’s Vikram Ahuja offers packages like stay at a vineyard in South Africa, Nile river cruise, belly dancing class, a workshop at the papyrus-making factory , to the AfrikaBurn Festival in October.

“We have seen a 20% and a 60% drop in enquiries for Europe and Turkey respectively due to rising crime last year. In winter, freezing Europe loses tourists. Tropical Africa is thus gaining prominence,” says Ahuja, who notes popular African destinations for Bengalureans in Kenya, Zanzibar, Tanzania, Egypt and now Morocco.

Climbing Africa’s Mount Kilimanjaro this year inspired general physician Dr Anindita Bhateja to launch her own exclusive travel company! Called Afrikan Adventures, Bhateja’s travel menu highlights fully-equipped treks to Mt Kilimanjaro with professional Tanzanian mountaineers besides safaris and routine sightseeing.”Europe and Australia are safer.Africa has always had a fear factor.Africans are poor but professional and proud of their country. It is actually an oasis in the desert,” she says.

Time to book a voyage to the world’s second-largest continent!

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Ain’t no mountain high if you are ready to face your fear: Dr. Anindita Bhateja’s journey to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro
“To escape fear, you have to go through it, and not around it.” Riche Norton’s words resonate in my head as Dr. Anindita Bhateja shares her journey of overcoming fear.

It was a grueling 48 hours atop Mt. Kilimanjaro, where, though pushed to the edge, Dr. Anindita overcame her fears and rediscovered humanity. A few seconds is what stands between death and us and no one understands the value of time than the doctors who undergo this battle on a daily basis. But what happens when a doctor’s life is hanging by the thread? Dr. Anindita found herself holding precariously to a sliver of life, on her first attempt to scale Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Born to doctor parents and married to one, Dr. Anindita’s early years were spent in Patna, where she did her schooling from Notre Dame Academy. Married into a family of doctors, and being surrounded by doctors all her life makes her a very calm and composed individual. “In the face of emergencies at home, or work, I am never rattled.”

Perhaps the only thing that rattles her is her fear of heights and this is how she overcame it:

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Dr. Anindita on far right

The first steps

Her early steps steps didn’t lead her to hiking or climbing but walking and half-marathons for even walking was a difficult activity for her.

It all started with her husband Dr. Arvind Bhateja’s decision to run a half-marathon.“I was heavy then and though I had lost some weight post pregnancy, I still had trouble walking. So when I heard from him that a half-marathon covered 21.5km, I exclaimed that I don’t even drive that much,” Dr. Anindita quips. However, her husband had a knee injury so he had to give up on the half-marathon and took to cycling. When he cycled in Cubbon Park in Bengaluru with their two children, Dr. Anindita took to walking. “It was tough for me, I took 45 minutes to do 2-2.5km,” she says.

The slow and steady win the race and so Dr. Aninita took one step at a time. In 2009, at the age of 39 she ran her first half-marathon because of the encouragement she received from her friend. Despite the self-doubt, she managed to complete it in four hours.

However, she recalls that her initial reaction was not of jubilation but anger. “I was angry at myself for having taken so much time and I decided to never do it again. It took around 15 days for me to cool off and savour the sense of achievement.” Till date, Dr. Anindita has run 12 half marathons across the world. She has done two in USA and one in Edinburgh and New Zealand each.

This set the tone for her to turn towards her biggest challenge – conquering her fear of heights.

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Dr. Anindita, second from right, climbing the Mt. Kilimanjaro

In 2014, on a trip to Bhutan with her husband and daughter she went atop Tiger’s Nest. It was an experience that pushed her to overcome her fear of heights. “It was like climbing the Mt. Everest for me. My head would spin every time I looked down. It took me six-and-a-half hours instead of four-and-a-half. My daughter held on to my hand for three hours while I cried, got angry and even threw up. I felt bad for what my husband and daughter had to go through because of me. So I decided to change that.”

Mt. Kilimanjaro

Dr. Anindita started reading up on mountaineering and the necessary skills required for it. For a novice like her, Mt. Kilimanjaro presented a perfect case. “It is one of the seven mountains of the worlds. It’s the peak of Africa and is 19,341 feet to be precise so I said, ‘let’s go to Kilimanjaro’,” she says.

One goal, one mission

Dr. Anindita set out to summit Mt. Kilimanjaro early this year with a group of individuals with the same mission. The climb lasted from January 27 to Feburary 2. She says, “I knew it was not going to be an easy climb. I had started worrying and fretting about it a month before. I was very petrified about what was going to happen.”

Given her fear of heights and spending a month clobbered by anxiety, she was already worried about the climb. “To keep myself motivated and going I told myself, I would take one step at a time and one camp at a time,” she says.

The group took the Kilimanjaro Machame route. Being the only one in the group without mountaineering and trekking experience, it was a huge challenge for her from day one. During the trek she also had to climb through a 5km-long straight wall, a result of a landslide years ago. This wall tested her strength and determination to the core.

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Going up the Mt. Kilimanjaro

Humanity triumphs

It was in that one week that she overcame her fears and found humanity –both atop Mt. Kilimanjaro. Two men in the group, Prosper Peter Malando and Frank Jumbe, who were professional mountaineers with over 15 years of experience, came to her rescue.

What takes people four hours took me 12 hours and every step of the way I had no energy in my bones; I could not walk, I thought I would die of exhaustion but – Frank and Peter kept me going. My life was in their hands. There were times when the climb was so narrow that they asked me to step on their foot and then walk over the narrow bits. Who does that for a stranger?

Given that mountainous terrain is not hundred percent safe and there is some element of risk involved, especially while climbing a straight wall tested all of Dr. Anindita’s mettle. Her fear of heights, lack of skill, and a risky climb combined to test her spirit and stamina. Places where the trail was narrow or difficult at that height made things difficult.

It was Peter and Frank’s patience and their generosity that saw them help her climb through. “For more than 48 hours, I was alone with them, safe and comfortable in their company. So much so that when we made it to the last camp, they fed me from their plates because I was so exhausted that I could not even eat food and drink water.”

She had made it to the last camp and since the exhaustion was extreme, she decided to not summit. It’s a decision she hasn’t regretted for she discovered two wonderful souls and a country she loves like her own. In a strange land she had found people who had supported her through a very tough and tiring time.

On top finally

After she got back to Bengaluru she kept on thinking about going back and summiting. So in June this year she went back with another friend and with the help of Peter and Frank she reached the top. No small feat at 46. She says,

The feeling was exhilarating. I had overcome fear last time round, and since I was familiar with the route there was no discomfort when I climbed the second time round.

Not only did she make it to the top she decided to share this experience with millions of people back home. “If I could do it others could too and that with the help of two amazing people like Peter and Frank.”

That is when she decided to start Afrikan Adventure.

Afrikan Adventure

Afrikan Adventure is an adventure company that helps to plan and assist treks to Kilimanjaro. Registered in Tanzania, she did the initial investment required for setting up the website and registering the company. Peter and Frank are an integral part of the company and accompany the individuals and groups who register.

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Dr. Anindita with Frank and Peter

“We offer options for people who are at different levels of fitness. Our guides know every bush and boulder along the route having spent most of their lives in Tanzania and dedicated it to Kilimanjaro. They lead teams of outstanding porters, cooks and aides to ensure absolute safety and comfort for every one of our clients.”

Given that climbing is a time and money-consuming activity, Dr. Anindita and her team are aware that things will pick up slowly.

Afrikan Adventure is her first step towards giving back to the community and helping others discover Mt. Kilimanjaro.

I want to go back and help the people there, putting my medical knowledge to good use and supporting the children through my alma mater Notre Dame Academy which has a branch in Tanzania.

For Dr. Anindita , who is based out of Bengaluru, Tanzania has become like her second home. Not only has she fallen in love with the country and its people she also has received a lot of love and gratitude. In a world defined by aggression, drive, competition and negativity, Dr. Anindita discovered humanity, compassion and benevolence among strangers in the process of facing and overcoming her fears.

BENGALURU: Seated in Cubbon Park, waiting for her husband and children to finish cycling, Dr Anindita Bhateja, who weighed 100 kg in 2009 never thought that one day she will be summiting Mt Kilimanjaro. She achieved the feat along with her friend Dr Anita Krishnan on June 28 this year. It was a seven-day-long expedition. She weighed 70 kg then.

She prepared herself for the expedition for six years. She started working on losing her weight and then prepared herself to trek, before she attempted the feat. She first started with walking in 2009. At 39, with a strong belief that it’s never too late to try something new, she started her journey as a runner. “I walked 2.5 km in 45 minutes. This later led to running. I  have done about a dozen half marathons and couple of 10 km runs since 2010. I started trekking in 2014 and then I attempted to climb MtKilimanjaro in 2016. I chose this mountain as it doesn’t require any mountaineering skills to climb this hill and it is a flat stretch. We would trek every day for 14-16 hours,” she says.

While climbing the mountain was challenging, getting down the slope was equally difficult she says as the mountain has loose rocks and stones. “But my guides Prosper Peter Malando and Frank Jumbe guided me well and went according to my speed. They have been climbing the stretch for over 10 and 13 years respectively,” says the general physician from the city.

Last 200 metres of her expedition is something that she will always remember. “I faced breathing problem just 200 metres before I reached the peak. But I decided to not give up. I dragged myself towards it and climbed till the peak (19,341 ft). Drinking water of course helped,” she explains.

But this is not the first time she attempted the feat. Her first attempt was in January this year. On the  fifth day she was exhausted and decided not to climb. She couldn’t stop thinking about going back after she returned to Bengaluru. To overcome her guilt, she decided to take up the challenge again in June. “I met Prosper Peter Malando and Frank Jumbe during my first attempt and decided to trek with them again in June. I loved the way they work so much that I have even started a company now called Afrikan Adventures with them and my second summit was as part of my startup,” she says.

With her first summit she learnt that she required some breathing exercises to sustain the harsh weather. She also learnt that the route that she had chosen  —  Machame route — was a little tougher so she decided to take another route — Rongai route — this time.

Apart from just learning how to trek to the hilltop, Prosper and Frank have also taught her to smile and stay happy in any situation they are in and love their job. Climbing Mt Kilimanjaro is not all that she aims at. She has Everest Base Camp, Inca Trail in South America and eight lakes of Kashmir in her bucket list.

Dr Anindita also wanted to get over her fear of heights and water. She went scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef with her children last year and obtained her certification.

While, through her startup, she helps people fulfill their dream of climbing Mt Kilimanjaro, she says that physical fitness and endurance are important to climb to the peak. “Any strength exercise will help them prepare themselves physically. But being mentally prepared is equally necessary she says, adding, “The weather there is cold and harsh. It can go up to -15 degrees. They would not get an opportunity to take bath and also have to change clothes in tent.”

Ask her about trek fee, she says it varies on the number of people in the group and on how many days they want to trek. “If a group of four is trekking for seven days, it would cost them around `1.5 lakh. Best time to trek is from June end to February,” she says.

Dr Anindita Bhateja weighed 100kg in 2009; after six years of training, she lost 30kg and along with her friend Dr Anita Krishnan climbed Mt Kilimanjaro.
From 100 kg to 19,000 ft. This article is published at 27 October 2016 11:09 from Express Buzz Bangalore News, click on the read full article link below to see further details.

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Stressed by her hectic lifestyle, this doctor took a break to tackle her physical and mental challenges

Anindita Bhateja, a general physician at Sita Bhateja Specialty Hospital, says she became a doctor as she was “fascinated” with her father and grandfather, also doctors. “As a child, I would go with them to their clinics and watch them diagnose problems without many investigations. They would listen to their patients,” recalls Anindita, who became a doctor in 1999. Her passion for adventure started in 2009, after childbirth, when she realised she was a 100 kilos! “I felt so unhealthy. How could I treat my patients? So I started taking off on long walks. Then got into a run and got hooked on to it and started participating in marathons,” she adds.

Soon, the doctor found herself addicted to walking and running. Now she is in the news as she is just back from climbing Kilimanjaro. The 46-year-old Anindita says the best part of running or walking is the time she gets to connect to herself. “Being a doctor is stressful. Sometimes you get affected by your patients’ pains and suffering. There are days when I walk from Bangalore Club to BIAL and then take a bus back.”

Having tackled her fitness and weight problem, Anindita wanted to face her fear of heights. She zeroed in on Kilimanjaro as “it is the only stable, free-standing mountain. The weather is not as unpredictable as in the Himalayas. You don’t need mountaineering skills to climb this mountain. You need trekking poles and a lot of mental strength to climb this 19,350 feet high mountain.”

Her first attempt was in January this year, she couldn’t complete the climb. So she returned recently and completed it. “It takes six to seven days to climb this mountain. It was difficult and amazing at the same time. The climb was an eye opener for me as it calmed me when I was in the midst of nature. You also learn to value the comfort you have back home. When you get back you are thankful for what you have rather than complain about life that you see around you, including the traffic. People there give you their best without expecting anything in return. They are always smiling and caring for others. This changed the way I looked at life.”

Now she encourages all her patients to walk, run or climb. Her love for Kilimanjaro has led her to start Afrikan Adventures with professional mountaineers, Prosper Peter Malando and Frank Jumbe. For more you can log on to afrikan-adventure.com

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Travel tales

excited The author (fourth) with her friends Prosper, Anita and Frank at the last camp Horombo hut.

We live in an age where we are hooked on to technology 24/7. Just as a car needs to be taken to the garage for service, so do we need to go back to our roots — nature to restore our souls. Having stared at screens — TV, computers and mobiles etc — I decided to shutdown from technology and literally log in to nature. That’s right! After zeroing in on Tanzania, situated in East Africa, my adventure started. The seven-day trek was a treat for my soul, body and mind.

Replete with mountains, lakes and forests with loads of safaris, Tanzania seemed to beckon me. Once registered, I was all set to take off on my trek to Uhuru (peak of Kilimanjaro) with a small group that included local guides. This not only challenged me physically but also gave me the much needed break, surrounded by the lush green forests of Africa.

The adventure kickstarted at Marangu Gate after a drive from Arusha town. From there it was off to Rongai, which was a one-hour drive. Our adventure commenced at 1,996 metres above sea level and gradually saw us climb, climb and climb.

The trek took us towards Nalemoru Gate, which started from the Kenyan side of the mountain. Soon we were passing through potato fields and tiny villages, where we got a glimpse of the rural life. As we walked, we were met by little, curious children, who ran up to us seeking money or goodies. After an hour on foot, we turned left which took us into the Montane forests.

By now, we had climbed quite a bit. We stopped and looked down and were treated with the sight of tiny twinkling lights of the Kenyan villages that lay far below. Amidst the lush greenery, we spotted the Colobus monkey and mongoose accompanied by the chirping of beautiful birds. This short trek was completed within three hours and we reached our first camp, Simba Camp. After a good meal and a night’s rest, we were raring to climb more. We took off to the Kikelewa Camp, which took us over rocks and little streams dotted with beautiful flowers along the way. The scenery was simply picture perfect. After a steady climb of four to five hours, we reached a clearing and were served piping hot lunch as well as given a 45-minute break. Then, it was a climb that took us to a campsite with a 30-feet deep cave. By now, we had climbed high enough and were above the clouds.

On the third day, we headed off towards Mawenzi Tarn, which was a steeper climb and the habitat gradually changed into moorlands. We reached a campsite with a tiny natural pond right at its centre — a perfect place to hit the sack.

On the fourth day, we continued to climb to the top of the ridge and the habitat changed to Alpine desert. From the ridge, we meandered in the saddle, where we saw a wreckage of a small plane that had crashed many moons ago. This cold steady climb took us to the School Hut, where we rested for the night.

Then we were off to Uhuru peak. This long day made the climb hard and challenging, which was rewarded with hot ginger tea at Hans Mayer Cave. The climb continued. This time it was steeper with rocky patches that almost left most of us breathless. After what seemed like eternity, we reached Gillman’s Point at 5,685 metres above sea level! Though the climb from here was less steep, it was a climb nonetheless to Uhuru at 5,895 metres. This was the roof of Africa and it gave us an adrenaline rush. Now it was time to head back. Whoever thought the climb down would be mundane was wrong. We were in for a visual treat with every step we took towards Horombo (3,705 metres), which still kept us above the clouds. The downhill journey continued to Marangu at 1,860 metres. After a steady downward trek, we reached the Montane forests, where we were again greeted by its natural inhabitants.

Once we reached Marangu Gate, it officially ended our trek. We were given a farewell with a lovely Kili song and a certificate, etching the journey in our minds forever.

How to get there
*We flew by Qatar Airways. The round trip flight cost for one from Bengaluru to Kilimanjaro via Doha is approximately Rs 70,000.

Where to stay
*We stayed at Tellamande Hotel in Arusha that cost Rs 2,600 per night for one person (inclusive of breakfast).

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Eleanor Roosevelt told us, “Do one thing every day that scares you”.

Dr. Anindita Bhateja is not doing one thing a day but she is getting pretty close to it. MD Medicine by qualification, consultant physician at Sita Bhateja Speciality Hospital by profession, Dr. Anindita has conquered more fears than most of us. On a typical day, her day starts with exercise and ends with her evenings juggling between home and work. Her work brings her in contact with patients ailing from diabetes, hypertension, and her speciality: infectious disease.

This is a typical day, but there are some atypical adventures that Dr. Anindita takes up in her life. She is set out to conquer her fears one at a time. A famous Latin proverb, “bis vincit qui se vincit” says he/she who prevails over himself/herself is twice victorious. That’s exactly what Dr. Anindita does. She faces her fears and conquers them, thus conquering herself.

Since childhood, Dr. Anindita had a fear of heights and she decided to overcome it in a grand fashion –  she scaled Tiger’s Nest, a 1000m climb ending with a Buddhist Monastery in September 2014. Her research on Tiger’s nest had warned her about its beauty and the difficulty in scaling it but, she moved ahead and climbed it with the help of her husband and 11-year-old daughter.

Dr. Anindita feels that her motivation for this regimen of conquering fear is the fact that there is only one life and she would like to do other things besides medicine in that period of time. Always up for trying something new, she decided to trek Kilimanjaro to better herself on this skill. Her first climb in January this year took her to the last camp but the summit went out of her reach. The biggest take away from this experience for Dr. Anindita, however, was her new found love for the mountains and the good people of Tanzania. Conquering acrophobia is just one feather in her hat. She has annihilated her fear of water by diving along with her fear of cycling too in the last year. However, this experience of scaling Kilimanjaro has brought her to a very interesting and promising juncture in her life.

afrikan-adventure-33

Her love for Tanzania pushed her to open a company in Tanzania to help people summit Mt. Kilimanjaro, do the safari, visit Masai village. Thus, African Adventure was born. This time, when she went to research and take the first tour of African Adventure in July 2016, she reached the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro.

A practicing doctor, a persistent adventurer Dr. Anindita does seem to have it all. However, the journey till there was not without impediments. She faced her biggest challenge when she decided to pursue MD Medicine just 2 months after giving birth to a child. The circumstances were complicated as she was the only one tending to her 2-month-old infant while her husband was away at Mumbai pursuing his MS Surgery.

Her supporting colleagues and faculty helped her hang on to the roller coaster ride of studying and taking care of an infant at home simultaneously. Their professional and neutral way of handling her situation made her strong and taught her the art of balancing her home afrikan-adventure-13and work. This resulted in her coming out of this situation as a mature responsible woman.  She also has a unique way of handling the adversities that come in her path. She elaborates by telling us that, “Before starting a difficult task or at difficult times, I always think as to what would be the worst case scenario if I fail, and in my mind, I accept that failure. Once that is done then I am not fearful of the difficult time anymore and I proceed with my actions to get through it.

Her dad too was a brilliant physician. His excellent bedside manner and clinical expertise made the days Dr. Anindita spent in his clinic extremely inspiring. She strongly feels he is the reason that she is a doctor today. Like her father, her husband also inspires her to push herself to the limit and achieve what she sets out to. He is also very proud of her overcoming her fears and charting new paths for her. The adventurer in her advises others to get out there and work at making their dream come true. The adorable mum in her tells the young parents to find joy in their children. Love them and enjoy their growing up years before they fly away.

The Storified.me team wishes her great success!

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